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Official Joseph Prince Sermon Notes

Come To The Feast Of Healing

Sunday, 7 March 2021
 

These are notes on the sermon, Come To The Feast Of Healing, preached by Pastor Joseph Prince on Sunday, 7 March 2021, at The Star Performing Arts Centre, Singapore. We hope these sermon notes will be an encouragement to you!

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Overview

  1. Introduction: Grow in grace as you grow in your personal knowledge of Jesus
  2. Fight your battles by feeding on the feast the Lord has prepared for you
  3. In times of darkness, God has prepared a great feast of His anointing and blessings for you to enjoy
  4. Feed on Jesus and His finished work and see His anointing blot out every sickness and disease
  5. In moments of great discouragement, come to the table and feed on His grace
  6. As you feed on God’s grace, you will live a life of true holiness
  7. The law prevents us from coming close to Jesus but grace compels us to draw near and receive freely from Him
  8. Focus on His love and grace for you and experience His restoration, healing, and wholeness
  9. Closing Prayer
  10. OWN THE WORD (life application)

Introduction: Grow in grace as you grow in your personal knowledge of Jesus

Pastor Prince prays 3 John 2, “Beloved, I pray that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers,” over everyone who is watching. He encourages us to continue praying for the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of Jesus (Eph. 1:16–18) because it is the knowledge of Christ that causes us to grow in grace.

We do not need to use our own effort to strive to know the Lord. Because of what Jesus has done and accomplished for us at the cross, we can all know Him intuitively:

None of them shall teach his neighbor, and none his brother, saying, ‘Know (‘ginóskó’) the Lord,’ for all shall know (‘oida’) Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them. For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their lawless deeds I will remember no more.”
— Hebrews 8:11–12 NKJV

Know (‘ginóskó’) the Lord . . . all shall know (‘oida’) Me” — The word “know” appears twice in verse 11. However, the Greek words used are different. We can try to know (“ginosko” — know by effort) the Lord, but under the new covenant, because of Jesus’ finished work, we all shall know (“oida” — have an internal revelation) of Him.

The reason we can know the Lord intuitively and intimately is that we have been forgiven of all our sins. Once you are established in the truth that your sins have been forgiven through Christ, once you know that there is nothing separating you from His presence and His love, you will truly know Him.

Believing the gospel of Jesus Christ is believing right, and right believing will produce right living (a life of true holiness).

Because we know that our sins are forgiven and all our iniquities and lawless deeds He remembers no more, we can know Him intuitively. Because we know Him intuitively, the Bible says He will be our God, and we will be His people (Heb. 8:10).

The new covenant of grace that we are living in today is all about God saying, “I will . . . I will . . . I will . . .” It is about God doing and blessing you because of the obedience and finished work of Jesus Christ. It is not about you trying to earn His blessings by your own efforts.

God says to you, “I will be to you the God who heals, therefore you are to Me a people who are healthy.”

God says to you, “I will be to you a Provider, and you will be to Me a people who are well provided for, blessed with more than enough to be a blessing to others.”

Therefore, God is able to put His laws in our hearts and write on our hearts today. The forgiveness of sins is the clause that puts in effect all these benefits.

Fight your battles by feeding on the feast the Lord has prepared for you

We are continuing from last week’s sermon, Prophetic Hope For The Future.

Last week, Pastor Prince shared about the prophecy found in Isaiah 25:

“And in this mountain shall the Lord of hosts make unto all people a feast of fat things, a feast of wines on the lees, of fat things full of marrow, of wines on the lees well refined. And he will destroy in this mountain the face of the covering cast over all people, and the vail that is spread over all nations. He will swallow up death in victory; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from off all faces; and the rebuke of his people shall he take away from off all the earth: for the Lord hath spoken it.”
— Isaiah 25:6–8 KJV

in this mountain” — In the previous chapter, we learned that this mountain refers to Mount Zion (Isa. 24:23). Whenever we read a prophetic truth in the Bible, we need to know it can be interpreted in 2 ways: in the natural and in the spiritual.

So this verse, “And he will destroy in this mountain the face of the covering cast over all people, and the vail that is spread over all nations,” can be interpreted in these ways:

  1. In the natural, one of the prominent characteristic features of the generation facing the COVID-19 pandemic is the mask (it is currently being worn by people all over the world). We can interpret this prophecy in the sense that God is going to put an end to this pandemic.
  2. In the spiritual, this verse is also talking about the veil covering the hearts of the Jewish people such that when they read the first five books of the Old Testament, they do not see Jesus in it but see only the law (2 Cor. 3:15). In these last days, God will destroy this veil that covers the eyes of their hearts so that they can see the Lord and His goodness (2 Cor. 3:16).

Is there an area in your life where you’re looking for answers? Go to the Word of God and ask Jesus to enlighten the eyes of your understanding.

He will swallow up death in victory” — This verse is also quoted by the apostle Paul in 1 Corinthians 15:54 to talk about the rapture. As we shared last week, these verses show the sequence of events to come in the end times:

  1. First, a great revival.
  2. Then, the destroying of the veil (in the natural: the pandemic will come to an end. In the spiritual: the eyes of many shall be open to the glory and beauty of Christ in all the Scriptures).
  3. Lastly, the rapture—where death is swallowed up in victory.

Before the destroying of this pandemic and before the rapture happens, there will be great feasts.

the Lord of hosts make unto all people a feast” — The first time God is called “the Lord of hosts” is in 1 Samuel 1:11, when Hannah prayed to God to have a child and she gave birth to the prophet Samuel. In Hebrew, it is translated as “the Lord of the armies.” When this phrase is used, it denotes the Lord declaring war on His enemies.

The war is won by us eating and us partaking of the feast the Lord has spread. In the end times, the Lord is going to give a great supper (Luke 14:16). Supper is taken at the end of the day and it is symbolic of the end-times we are living in right now.

In this last generation before the rapture, the Lord is compelling us to enjoy the spread that He has prepared for us.

In times of darkness, God has prepared a great feast of His anointing and blessings for you to enjoy

Before the destroying of the pandemic and before the lifting of the veil on people’s hearts and minds (2 Cor. 4:4), there will be a great spread and feast.

Last week, we talked about the symbolism of the feast of the wines on the lees but today, we will be focusing on the “fat things” that are mentioned in this prophecy.

“And in this mountain shall the Lord of hosts make unto all people a feast of fat (‘shemen’) things, a feast of wines on the lees, of fat things full of marrow, of wines on the lees well refined.”
— Isaiah 25:6 NKJV

fat things” — In Hebrew, this is the word “shemen, which means “oil,” and it is one of the root words of Gethsemane or “oil press,” the place where Jesus went through such immense stress and agony right before He went to the cross that He sweat blood.

Olive oil is produced when the olive fruit is crushed under a great weight in an olive press. In the same manner, Jesus was crushed under the weight of our sins and under the judgment of God to produce the anointing oil that heals us today.

In this feast the Lord has prepared for us in these last days, there is an abundance of anointing for our healing.

It is important to note that all this is happening on Mount Zion. Make sure you are on Mount Zion, the mountain of grace, and not on Mount Sinai, the mountain of law.

“And so terrifying was the sight that Moses said, "I am exceedingly afraid and trembling.") But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, to an innumerable company of angels,”
— Hebrews 12:21–22 NKJV

We are no longer on the mountain that causes us to be exceedingly afraid because we have come to Mount Zion, where we can draw near to God with peace on our conscience.

We are no longer bound by or put under the law. We are under grace. We have moved from Mount Sinai to Mount Zion. We are not under demand but under God’s unending supply of grace.

Under grace, it is not about what we must do in order to reach God, but it is about what He has done and what He will do for us. Knowing this will not cause us to be lazy, but it will cause us to receive and be a channel of His supply. We will allow the Lord to work in us to will and to do according to His good pleasure (Phil. 2:13). We will be like the burning bush—on fire but not consumed, burning up but not burned out.

Feed on Jesus and His finished work and see His anointing blot out every sickness and disease

“And in this mountain shall the Lord of hosts make unto all people a feast of fat (‘shemen’) things, a feast of wines on the lees, of fat things full of marrow (‘machah’), of wines on the lees well refined.”
— Isaiah 25:6 NKJV

marrow” — In Hebrew, this is the word “machah,which does not just refer to the marrow of a bone but is most commonly used to mean “blot out,” “exterminate,” “wipe out,” or “abolish.”

At Mount Zion, the Lord is going to pour forth an anointing that will blot out, exterminate, and wipe out the things that plague us. The marrow also plays a big part in our body’s immune system, which produces antibodies to fight off viruses and diseases. This is what the Lord has in store for us—a rich feast of His healing anointing to wipe out and blot out diseases and sicknesses.

But what will this feast look like? The gospels give us a picture of it:

“Jesus departed from there, skirted the Sea of Galilee, and went up on the mountain and sat down there. Then great multitudes came to Him, having with them the lame, blind, mute, maimed, and many others; and they laid them down at Jesus' feet, and He healed them.”
— Matthew 15:29–30 NKJV

went up on the mountain” — This is not Mount Zion, but it is a type of it. This mountain was where great multitudes brought the lame, the maimed, and the sick to Jesus. There was an overflowing anointing from Jesus to save, heal, and restore. Wherever Jesus is, He is the anointing—He is the feast that exterminates and wipes out the sickness in those who come to Him.

Jesus not only saves but also heals.

It is important for us to preach this. Faith comes by hearing (Rom. 10:17). Whatever we hear, we will have the faith for. That is why we need to continue hearing and sharing the good news of Jesus Christ.

This is the feast the Lord is preparing for us—a feast of His anointing—that we can look forward to experiencing in the end-times. We will see and experience God’s overflowing anointing that will blot out and eradicate disease, debt, and everything that came as a result of the fall.

In moments of great discouragement, come to the table and feed on His grace

It is vital for us to remember that all these things will happen on Mount Zion, not Mount Sinai. This means that we will experience all these blessings when we are under grace, not the law.

“Now this, "Yet once more," indicates the removal of those things that are being shaken, as of things that are made, that the things which cannot be shaken may remain. Therefore, since we are receiving a kingdom which cannot be shaken, let us have grace, by which we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear.
— Hebrews 12:27–28 NKJV

the removal of those things that are being shaken, as of things that are made, that the things which cannot be shaken may remain” — We are living in such times when many things that we know or are familiar with are being shaken, e.g. entertainment, sports, business, the economy, and the way we work. In the last days, anything that is man-made will be shaken so that what remains will be the things that are unshakable, i.e. the things of God and the things that have been ordained by God.

let us have grace, by which we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear” — Grace must always come first. It comes before reverence and godly fear. Without grace, even our serving can be done out of a servile spirit, which the Lord has delivered us from (Rom. 8:15 KJV). Our heavenly Father wants us to serve with a spirit of sonship, not a spirit of slavery. Only by grace can we serve God acceptably with reverence and true godly fear.

God showed the prophet Elijah the importance of grace when he tried to seek refuge in the law

At this point in Elijah’s life, he is discouraged because he is being hunted down by Jezebel:
“And there he went into a cave, and spent the night in that place; and behold, the word of the Lord came to him, and He said to him, “What are you doing here, Elijah?””
— 1 Kings 19:9 NKJV

What are you doing here, Elijah?” — Elijah had run to Mount Horeb, which is Mount Sinai where the law was given. He wasn’t supposed to be there. There is a lesson here that God wants us to learn: In moments of great discouragement and depression, there is a tendency for us to go back to relying on our own self-effort.

The Lord is asking some of us this today: “What are you doing here, striving by your own efforts again? Why do you see Me as a Father who is constantly demanding from you?”

In the parable of the talents in Matthew 25, we see how having a negative opinion of God produces negative results in life. Out of the three servants, only two of them reaped good results. The last servant did not. Why? He saw the Lord as a “hard man” who wanted to take from him instead of give to him (Matt. 25:24). Our perception of the Lord will affect the way we serve, love, and whether or not we enjoy the relationship we have with Him. It will affect how much we receive from Him and whether or not we run to Him for help when we need it.

What is your opinion of God today?

Your heavenly Father wants you to have a good opinion of Him!

As you feed on God’s grace, you will live a life of true holiness

True grace is not a license to sin. When we are under grace, we do not become lawless/immoral. Grace brings about true holiness—a holiness that exceeds what the law can bring about.

The law says, “Thou shalt not steal,” but it has no ability to make us cheerful givers. Grace not only gives you the power to refrain from stealing, but also the desire to be a blessing to others. The law says, “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” and there are people who do not commit adultery outwardly, but inwardly, they have no love for their spouse. Grace changes that—it goes deeper and causes you to love your spouse as Christ first loved the church.

In Luke 18 and 19, we see a stark contrast between the result of receiving grace and the result of being under the law. A rich young ruler boasted in his ability to keep the law, but in the end, he was unable to give up a single cent of his wealth and follow Jesus. But when Zacchaeus, a corrupt tax-collector, received grace from Jesus, he became so generous that he wanted to give half of his wealth to the poor and repay fourfold every person he had stolen from (Luke 19:8).

True grace always produces true holiness.

We need to start living in the spirit of Mount Zion, under grace and supply. We cannot have one foot in Mount Sinai and one foot in Mount Zion, which is to live under a mixture of law and grace. It is important for us to esteem the law as God ordained it to be—not to justify ourselves by but to cause us to see our guilt and our need for Jesus (Rom. 3:19–20). The law was never meant to produce holiness in us. Only grace can produce true holiness from the inside out.

It was Elijah’s refuge in the law that caused him to have to step down from his position of leadership

Instead of pleading with God for Israel, Elijah pleaded with God against Israel. He justified himself and condemned God’s people (Rom. 11:2–5). In response, God demonstrated how He was not found in the spectacular and overt displays of power, which Elijah’s ministry was marked by, but He was found in the still, small voice of grace.

“And when Elijah heard it, he wrapped his face in his cloak . . . And behold, there came a voice to him and said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?””
— 1 Kings 19:13 ESV

he wrapped his face in his cloak” — The law causes you to be afraid and to hide yourself. It was only when Elijah heard the still, small voice of God that he came out of hiding. It was grace that drew him to God, not the law.

Even though the people of Israel deserved judgment, God’s heart was not to judge them but to show them grace. That’s why God rebuked Elijah and instructed him to anoint his successor, Elisha, a prophet of grace (1 Kings 19:15–16).

When Jesus (who is grace personified) was transfigured on the Mount of Transfiguration, Elijah (who represented the prophets) and Moses (who represented the law) also appeared. When Peter tried to put Jesus on the same level as the prophets and the law by suggesting to build three tabernacles for Jesus, Elijah, and Moses, God the Father spoke up, saying, “This is my beloved Son, hear Him” (Luke 9:35).

And the first thing Jesus said to them was, “Fear not.” This is the voice of grace.

“and Jesus having come near, touched them, and said, ‘Rise, be not afraid,’ and having lifted up their eyes, they saw no one, except Jesus only.
— ‭‭Matthew‬ ‭17:7–8‬ ‭YLT‬‬

they saw no one, except Jesus only” — This is what God wants us to learn: See and hear only Jesus, the voice of grace.

The law prevents us from coming close to Jesus but grace compels us to draw near and receive freely from Him

While Elijah represents the prophets, Moses represents the law.

Let’s look at Moses’ story. It is in the story of God appearing to Moses in the burning bush that we see how the law prevents us from coming close to God. In contrast, the story of the prodigal son shows us how grace compels us to draw near and receive freely from God.

“Now Moses was tending the flock of Jethro his father-in-law, the priest of Midian. And he led the flock to the back of the desert, and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. And the Angel of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire from the midst of a bush. So he looked, and behold, the bush was burning with fire, but the bush was not consumed. Then Moses said, "I will now turn aside and see this great sight, why the bush does not burn." So when the Lord saw that he turned aside to look, God called to him from the midst of the bush and said, "Moses, Moses!" And he said, "Here I am." Then He said, "Do not draw near this place. Take your sandals off your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground."”
— Exodus 3:1–5 NKJV

the Angel of the Lord appeared to him . . . Then He said, "Do not draw near"” — This refers to the pre-incarnate appearance of Jesus. This is the first time God appeared and spoke to Moses and His first instruction to Moses was: “Do not draw near.” This is an important lesson that God wants us to learn.

In contrast, let’s look at the parable of the prodigal son that Jesus shared in Luke 15:

At the beginning of the story, the son left his father, took all his inheritance, and wasted it all on prodigal living. When he had nothing left and was starving, he decided to go back home because he remembered that in his father’s house, there was always bread enough to spare (Luke 15:17). So he prepared a speech to give to his father so that his father would take him back. The father in this story is a picture of God.

“And he arose and came to his father. But when he was still a great way off, his father saw him and had compassion, and ran and fell on his neck and kissed him. And the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and in your sight, and am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ But the father said to his servants, ‘Bring out the best robe and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand and sandals on his feet.”
— Luke 15:20–22 NKJV

Do not draw near this place” VS “when he was still a great way off, his father saw him and had compassion, and ran and fell on his neck and kissed him

Under the law, Moses was not allowed to draw near to God. Under grace, the father of the prodigal son runs toward his son the moment he sees him even though he had sinned.

Take your sandals off your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground” VS “put sandals on his feet

Under the law, Moses was instructed to remove his sandals before God. Sandals or shoes represent possession and one’s standing. For Moses to be told to remove his sandals meant that he had no right to stand before God. But under grace, the father commanded that sandals be put on his son. Grace reconciles us to the Father! Through the finished work of Christ, we can stand righteous before Him.

Under the law, Moses could not draw near because he was standing on holy ground. Under grace, we can draw near and stand before God because the place where we stand today is grace ground. This does not negate God’s holiness. There is no conflict between grace and holiness. We are to be holy as God is holy, but you cannot be truly holy without the grace of God (1 Peter 1:13, 16 KJV).

Because of what Christ has done, we stand on grace ground today, where we can stand before God righteously and with peace in our hearts.

God’s holiness is on our side because of what Jesus Christ has rightfully accomplished at the cross. God’s holiness at the cross punished Jesus for all our sins, which is why today, His holiness demands the acquittal of the one who puts his trust in Christ. Today, when you put your trust in Christ and His finished work, God’s holiness is on your side, demanding your justification and blessing.

The only way to grow is to grow in grace (2 Peter 3:18a). When we have grace, we can truly serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear.

God’s grace is not against God’s perfect law of the Ten Commandments. There is no fight between law and grace. At the cross, Jesus reconciled God’s righteousness and peace. Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other (Ps. 85:10 KJV). At the cross, all the attributes of God were glorified and even the law was magnified by the fulfillment and death of Christ.

Focus on His love and grace for you and experience His restoration, healing, and wholeness

The first time Peter met Jesus, he was more conscious of Jesus’ holiness than His love (Luke 5:8), and out of fear, he told Jesus to depart from him. It is natural for man to shun God because of His holiness. But it takes the Holy Spirit’s revelation to truly know Jesus and know His love for us.

A few years after this incident, after Peter had denied Jesus three times with cursing and swearing, he comes face to face with Jesus again:

“Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord . . . and plunged into the sea.”
— John 21:7 NKJV

This time, instead of being conscious of his sin and asking the Lord to depart from him (Luke 5:8), which he had all the more reason to do, Peter was actually more conscious of Jesus’ love for him than he was conscious of Jesus’ holiness. If he had been more conscious of Jesus’ holiness, Peter would have run for fear and shame. Yet even after his failure, he was so conscious and compelled by Jesus’ love for him that he plunged into the sea and swam straight to Him.

The Christian life does not begin with holiness but with the love of God. As we are consumed with His love, true holiness will be a natural product of that relationship with God.

The secret to being full of God:

“May be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height; And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.”
— Ephesians 3:18–19 KJV

This is what God wants for us: to be filled until overflowing with the fullness of Him and His love.

It is not about how much we love God but how much He loves us.

True holiness does not draw you away from Jesus but draws you closer to Him. When Jesus was walking on earth, multitudes flocked to Him and followed after Him even though some of them were great sinners. Yet all of them received from Him.

Today, the feast of grace and healing is spread. Are you ready to partake of what He has already prepared for you?

Pastor Prince prays for those who have ailments or pain in their body.

Pastor Prince encourages us to tune in every Sunday, and especially as a family if you can. Set aside this time to lean in to what the Lord has for you, and don’t allow yourself to be distracted by chores or other things.

Closing Prayer

“This coming week, the Lord bless you and the Lord keep you. The Lord make His face to shine upon you and be favorable to you. The Lord lift up His countenance on you and grant to you and all your families His shalom peace, well-being, and wholeness in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, Amen.”

Own The Word

Are you facing a health challenge, a debt, or some other difficult situation? Are you feeling discouraged, stressed out, or demanded from?

How do you come to the table and feast on God’s supply?

The way we come to the table and partake of God’s anointing that brings healing, breaks bondages, and offers supply for all your needs is to come under grace.

Today, have a conversation with the Lord and ask Him to show you the areas in your life where you might have unconsciously been living under the law (being demand-minded) instead of living under His grace (being supply-minded). If you have been looking to yourself for the answers you need, can you hear the Lord saying this to you today?—“What are you doing here, striving by your own efforts? Why do you see Me as a God who is constantly demanding from you instead of helping you?”

Friend, the Lord wants you to see Him as the God who is always supplying to you. He is your Healer. He is your Provider.

If you are struggling to have a good opinion of God, open up the gospels and see how Jesus ministered to all who came to Him. See how He healed the sick, opened blind eyes, unstopped deaf ears, and raised the dead to life again.

Meditate on verses like this:

“Jesus departed from there, skirted the Sea of Galilee, and went up on the mountain and sat down there. Then great multitudes came to Him, having with them the lame, blind, mute, maimed, and many others; and they laid them down at Jesus' feet, and He healed them.”
— Matthew 15:29–30 NKJV

These moments in Jesus’ ministry are pictures of how He wants to supply to you today. As you meditate on them, may you “know the love of Christ which passes knowledge; that you may be filled with all the fullness of God” (Eph. 3:19) and feast on the healing and provision He has prepared for you!

We hope these sermon notes blessed you! If they did, we encourage you to get the sermon and allow the Lord to speak to you personally as you watch or listen to it.

© Copyright JosephPrince.com 2021
These sermon notes were taken by volunteers during the service. They are not a verbatim representation of the sermon.


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